Reading an Agatha Christie novel,

playing sleuth along with Poirot,

and referred to attached

documents and clues,

one realizes certain limitations

in ebooks.

5 comments:

Fred said...

I'm a little confused. Attached documents and clues? Granted, I've only ever read three Christie books (and only two Poirot ones), but I don't recall attached documents in clues in my non-ebooks.

sjc said...

What can I say? I'm reading this book, Hastings says, "Here, I'll attach a drawing of the floorplan, for clarity," and "Here, I'll include a reproduction of the scrap of paper we found in the fireplace," and then there isn't any such thing.

Fred said...
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Fred said...

Oh, okay, now I get it. I don't remember if there were any of those in "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd" or "The ABC Murders". It's funny, I was actually just thinking last night how I don't exactly like that sort of thing in a novel. I mean, obviously there are some times when a simple sketch is needed or wanted, but it tends to break the illusion for me and remind me that I'm reading a book and these people aren't real. Does that make any sense? I think I just like it better when a writer describes something in words. (Reposting this, sorry. Blogger's comments are less than perfect. When commenting, you can only see the initial post, not any of the other comments. And that no-line-break thing is kind of annyoing. It also looks like it ate half of my last comment. I'll try to delete the redundant one when and if it lets me.)

sjc said...
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